Right People, Doing the Right Things, Right.

Team building is all about getting the right people doing the right things in order to accomplish a shared vision.

This isn’t a new idea.

Jim Collins wrote about this in Good to Great, describing “disciplined people” and “disciplined action” as core components of breakthrough momentum.

In the Mastering the Rockefeller Habits, Verne Harnish describes this as “the right people doing the right things right.

Right People is primarily a question of being: character, competence and chemistry.

If you have the wrong person on your team, you have some tough choices ahead.

Wrong people don’t very often become the right people and even when they do it typically happens over a long period of time.

As a leader, it’s doubtful your personality or your strategic plan have the patience for that.

Right things is primarily a question of doing: strategy, tactics and execution.

If your team is spending their time, talent and energy doing the wrong things it is probably more a reflection on you than them.

In this case, clarifying what and how can bring big changes in performance in a short period of time.

What needs to be in place so that you can have The Right People Doing the Right Things Right?

Here is a good starting point.

Everyone in your company wants to know what it means to have the right people, doing the right things, right.

I’m Canada, so I’ll use a hockey example.

Would a person who has great skills as a skater, stick handler, passer and shooter automatically be great hockey player?

Not if they don’t know the rules of hockey!

In looking at your own business, how can that person you just hired with all the necessary skills, knowledge and experience do a great job and deliver results that meet your expectations if you haven’t explained the rules of the game to them?

You need to explain the rules of the game

In the workplace context, the rules of the game would look like job descriptions, organizational charts, performance appraisals, written systems and procedures.

Most important of all: written vision, mission and culture statements that everyone lives by.

That way you can focus on whether or not you and your team have lived or played the game by the rules, rather than wondering what the rules themselves are.

And everyone would know what doing a good job would look like!

How well have you established the rules of the game?

How well does your team know those rules?

Systems and structures ensure that you have the right people doing the right things, right

How many of the components below do you have in place in your business? If you’d like some help setting up these systems in your business, book a 15-minute call on my calendar here: Book 15 minutes with John